TRENDS IN THE ACTIVITIES OF THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT ANAMBRA STATE


TRENDS IN THE ACTIVITIES OF THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT ANAMBRA STATE

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ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the impact of the extension services of Green River Project (GRP) on fish farmers in Niger Delta, Nigeria. Specifically, it sought to ascertain fishery technologies received by GRP fish farmers; determine adoption of fish farming technologies by fish farmers; determine impact of extension services of GRP on socioeconomic condition of the fish farmers as at the year 2012; ascertain farmers’ perceived constraints to adoption of GRP fish farming technologies; ascertain constraints to effective performance of extension services of GRP and determine perceived strategies to improve effectiveness of the extension services of GRP. The study was carried out in Niger Delta, Nigeria. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select 120 fish farmers and 20 GRP personnel. Data were collected through the use of questionnaire and interview schedule. Descriptive statistics (frequency, mean statistic, percentage) were used to present data while t-test, regression, chi-square and factor analysis with varimax rotation were used to analyze the data. Mean age of GRP fish farmers and personnel were 50 and 41.70 years, respectively. Majority (76.7% of fish farmers and 65% of GRP personnel) of respondents were male. Also majority (77.5%) of the fish farmers and all (100%) the GRP personnel were married. The respondents were literates. Majority (70.0) of the fish farmers also engaged in other income generating activities. Average household size of the fish farmers and GRP personnel were 6.0 and 4.0 persons, respectively. Average years of participation in GRP for the fish farmers was 8.00 years while the mean years of working with GRP of the personnel was 12.65years. The farmers’ average number of contact with GRP was 4.0 times per month. GRP personnel used different types of teaching methods such as the use of contact group (100%), T&V system (90%) and SPAT (85.0%). Majority (86.7%) of the fish farmers belonged to social organisations. Majority of respondents received most of the technologies disseminated. Adoption index of fish farm management technologies, feeding techniques, fish culture management technique, water quantity and quality management techniques and liming techniques were 0.79, 0.77, 0.77, 0.88 and 0.52 respectively. Extension services of GRP had impact on quantity of fingerlings stocked (t=6.398; p≤ 0.05) and quantity of fishes harvested (t=6.279; p≤ 0.05); income from fishes produced (t=7.390; p≤ 0.05) among others. Constraints to adoption of GRP technologies were grouped into technology dissemination constraints; project implementation and sustainability constraints among others. Some socioeconomic characteristics of the respondents (age (years), years spent in formal education and years of participation in GRP) influenced the adoption of the fish farming technologies. Therefore, the null hypothesis was rejected for these variables. There was significant difference between the average quantities of fish stocked and average quantity of fish harvested by the fish farmers in Imo and Rivers States after participation in GRP hence the null hypothesis was rejected. The null hypothesis was rejected while the alternative hypothesis was accepted. It further revealed that there was no significant difference between the average income earned by the fish farmers in Imo and Rivers States after participation in GRP and the null hypothesis was accepted. Implementation constraints to effective performance of extension services of GRP according to GRP personnel included: climatic uncertainties and flooding (M= 1.55) and delay in input supply (M=1.20). It was recommended that there is need to increase youth involvement in the project (90.0%), increase farmers’ participation in decision making (90.0%) and increase the number of trained extension personnel (85.0%).

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Title page                                                                                                                    i

 

Certification                                                                                                                ii

 

Dedication                                                                                                                  iii

 

Acknowledgement                                                                                                      iv

 

Abstract                                                                                                                      v

 

Table of contents                                                                                                        vi

 

List of Tables                                                                                                              vii

 

List of Figures                                                                                                            ix

 

List of Pictures                                                                                                            x

 

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

 

Background information                                                                                 1

Problem statement                                                             4

Purpose of the study                                                          7

Hypotheses of the study                                          7

Significance of the study                                                     7

CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW

 

2.1.      Concept of agricultural projects                                       9

 

2.2.      Overview of fishery projects in Nigeria                                         11

 

2.3.      Improved fish farming activities and technologies 13

 

2.4.      Overview of agricultural extension services in Nigeria 19

 

2.5.      The Green River Project                                                                                 25

 

2.6.      Concept of adoption of innovations                       28

 

2.7.      Concept of evaluation                                                                                     35

 

2.8.      Theories/models of evaluation                           40

 

2.9.      Conceptual framework                                                   53

 

CHAPTER THREE:              METHODOLOGY

 

3.1       Study area                                                                                                       54

 

3.2       Population and sampling procedure    59

 

3.3       Instrument for data collection                    60

 

3.4       Measurement of variables                                              61

 

3.5       Data Analysis                                                                                                  63

 

CHAPTER FOUR: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

 

4.1       Socio-economic characteristics of GRP fish farmers and GRP personnel                            65

 

4.2:      Fish farming technologies received by the GRP fish farmers   76

 

4.3:      Adoption of GRP fish farming technologies by fish farmers 80

 

4.4       Impact of extension services of GRP on socioeconomic condition of the fish farmers        85

 

4.5       Constraints to adoption of fish farming technologies disseminated by GRP         97

 

4.6       Implementation constraints to effective performance of extension services of GRP                      100

 

4.7:      Perceived strategies to enhancing the effectiveness of the extension services                            102

 

4.8       Testing of Hypothesis (Socio-economic characteristics of farmers influencing adoption of fish farming technologies)                           104

 

4.9       Testing of differences in socioeconomic conditions of GRP fish farmers in Rivers and Imo States                                                                    108

 

CHAPTER FIVE:    Summary, Conclusion and Recommendation

 

5.1       Summary                                                                                                         110

 

5.2       Conclusion                                                                                                      112

 

5.3       Recommendation                                                    114

 

REFERENCES                                                                                            115

 

APPENDIX                                                                                                   124

 

LIST OF TABLES

 

Table 1: Comparison of cost and nutritional values of different sources of  animal protein per 100 g serving                                                13

 

Table 2: Sampling frame                                          60

 

Table 3: Percentage distribution of respondents according to socioeconomic characteristics           73

 

Table 4: Method of extension teaching used by GRP personnel   75

 

Table 5:  Percentage distribution of respondents according to fish farming technologies benefitted from GRP                                                                        79

 

Table 6: Distribution of farmers according to their adoption of improved fish farming technologies                                                                              84

 

Table 7: Distribution of respondents according to impact of extension services of GRP on socioeconomic conditions                                            90

 

Table 8: Distribution of respondents according to impact of extension services of GRP                                                                                            96

 

Table 9: Constraints to adoption of GRP fish farming technologies by fish farmers                                                                                                          100

 

Table 10: Distribution of respondents according to implementation constraints to effective performance of the extension services of GRP                         102

 

Table 11: Percentage distribution of respondents according to their perceived  strategies to enhancing the effectiveness of the extension services   104

 

Table 12: Socio-economic characteristics of GRP fish farmers influencing adoption of GRP fish farming technologies                                               107

 

Table 13: Comparison of socio-economic conditions of Imo and Rivers State GRP fish farmers            109

 

LIST OF FIGURES

 

Figure 1: Organogram of Green River Project             28

 

Figure 2:  A model of five stages in the innovation-decision process   30

 

Figure 3:  Sigmoid pattern of diffusion                                     31

 

Figure 4: Snyder evaluation model                                                  42

 

Figure 5: Advanced technology program evaluation logic model         44

 

Figure 6: Kirkpatrick-Phillips learning evaluation model     46

 

Figure 7:  Progamme action logic model                              49

 

Figure 8: Schema showing the impact of extension services of GRP on fish farmers in Niger Delta, Nigeria                                                                       53

 

Figure 9: Map of Niger delta, Nigeria showing the study area  56

 

Figure 10: Map of Rivers State showing the study area    57         

 

Figure 11: Map of Imo State showing the study area    58

 

Figure 12: Extension contact of GRP fish farmers   74

 

Figure 13: Impact of extension service of GRP on proportion of income saved by respondents before and after participation in GRP  97

 

LIST OF PICTURES

 

Picture 1: A farmer in Obrikom, Rivers State displaying fish spunning and/or hatchery ponds                      90

 

Picture 2: A farmer in Omoku, Rivers State showing size of fish harvested       91

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

 

1.         BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The development of state ministry of agriculture in Nigeria changed in political structure after independence. The three regions structure in 1960 gave way to four regions in 1963 and this equally gave way to states creation from 1967 up to 1996 (Ayoola, 2010).  The roles of the ministry of agriculture include the following: – Organizing of short duration seminars and workshops to farmers.  Providing farmers credit, subsidies and other incentives to boost total output in the various special programmes undertaken by the state government, Agricultural Development Programme (ADP), International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), World Bank, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and other support programmes. Conduct market surveys to determine current prices of agricultural inputs and products. Carry out the technical implementation of all agricultural loan schemes. Pest control services. Overseeing the activities of all agriculture related Parastatals and Companies (www.riverstate.gov.ng).

Agriculture in Nigeria has witnessed drastic changes in government programmes ranging from administration, funding, manpower and learning skills, and infrastructural facilities to creation of research institutes (Madukwe, 2008). The first post colonial development era of 1962-1968 period emphasized the introduction of more modern agricultural methods through farm settlements, co-operative plantations, supply of improved farm implements and a greatly expanded agricultural extension service. Some specialized development schemes initiated during this period include: the National Accelerated Food Production Programme (NAFPP), 1972; The World Bank-funded Agricultural Development Projects (ADP) 1975; River Basin and Rural Development Authorities (RBDA) 1976; Operation Feed the Nation, 1976; and Green Revolution Programme, 1980; among others (Jibowo & Ajayi, 2011).

Agricultural Development Programme (ADP) was a bilateral agreement between the World Bank and the Federal Government of Nigeria in 1975. ADP idea is an offshoot of the concept of integrated agricultural and rural development (Jibowo, 2005). The objective is to improve the levels of living and welfare of farmers. It started as an enclave in some states to a multi-stage ADP. The ADP is the implementation organ of the state ministries of agriculture and natural resources (Jibowo and Ajayi, 2011). ADP programmes consist of adaptive research, extension transfer, input supply and rural infrastructure.

Operation feed the Nation (OFN) (1975) was designed to mobilize the general public into participating in agricultural production using mass and individual extension methods (Iwuchukwu and Igbokwe, 2012). Some of these strategies included subsidized production inputs, increased bank credit to farmers, establishment of commodity boards and fixing of attractive prices for agricultural produce (Daneji, 2011). Its main aim was to greatly reduce the cost of living particularly in the urban areas with everybody being able to wholly or partly feed himself (Adebayo and Okuneye, 2011).

River Basin and Rural Development Authorities (RBDA) was launched in 1976. Primarily, the schemes were to harness the country’s water resources by providing employment opportunities through intensified crop, livestock and fisheries production with the hope of improving the standard of living of the rural population (Williams, 1981). Their functions were to facilitate land development and ensure efficient water resource management. Even though the project has succeeded several regimes, irrigated land in Nigeria stood at 0.7% (Adebayo and Okuneye, 2011)

The Directorate of Foods, Road and Rural Infrastructure (DFRRI) was established in 1987 with a mandate to open the rural areas through the construction of access roads, and provision of basic amenities of modern living but due to the following reasons, the programme was not sustainable: The programme was inevitable because it has long been realized according to Otubanjo (1992) that the economic future of Nigeria depends on the development of rural areas. Therefore, the potentials of rural areas were seen to be both immediate and long term (Daneji, 2011). The idea of opening up of rural areas with feeder roads and integrating it with other parts of the country provided basis for food that could be evacuated to enhance the quantity of food and raw materials consumption. During the period of 1980-1988, 30,000km roads were constructed from the targeted 60,000km estimated by DFFRI. The poor quality of infrastructures provided by the directorate probably due to mismanagement of fund made the impact of the programme almost insignificant. However, the directorate had been criticized in the past for lack of proper focus and programme accountability (Idachaba, 1988).

National Poverty Eradication Programme (NAPEP) (1999) mode of operation is tailored towards (subsidized) credit to farmers. The programme consists of four schemes namely, youth empowerment scheme which involves capacity acquisition, mandatory attachment, and credit delivery; Rural infrastructures development scheme which involves the provision of portable water, rural electrification, transportation and communication development; Social welfare Services Scheme which is involved with qualitative education, primary health care, farmers empowerment and provision of social services, provision of agricultural input and credit delivery to rural farmers; and Natural Resources Development and Conservation Scheme which contains programmes for environmental protection through conservation of land and space, development of agricultural resources, solid minerals and waters resources.

National Fadama Development programme (1999) is aimed at increasing income of beneficiaries by at least 20%. It is a major instrument for achieving the government’s poverty reduction objective in rural areas of Nigeria. The programme empowers the association with resources, training, and technical assistance support to properly manage and control the resources for their own development.

Apart from those initiated by federal government and implemented in the state, they were some programmes and projects initiated by Anambra state government which include; Grain Production Agency 1991; Poverty Alleviation Programme 2002; Volunteer Service Agency (VSA) 1991; Anambra State Tractor Hiring Company (ASTRAC) 1991; Small Holder Management Unit 1991; State Agricultural Credit Scheme (SACS) 1991; State Loan Implementation Committee (SIC) 2006; National Programme for Food Security (NPFS) 2007. However, the scope of activities in various programmes mentioned among others, are similarly implemented in areas of policies, funding, manpower training, recruitment and that forms the essence of the problem of this research.

TRENDS IN THE ACTIVITIES OF THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT ANAMBRA STATE

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  • TYPE : PROJECT MATERIAL
  • FORMAT : MICROSOFT WORD
  • ATTRIBUTE : Documentation Only
  • PAGES : 130 Pages
  • CHAPTERS : 1 - 5
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A Review on trends in the activities of the ministry of agriculture and rural development anambra state, trends, activities, ministry project topics, researchcub.info, project topic, list of project topics, research project topics, journals, books, Academic writer.
This study evaluated the impact of the extension services of Green River Project (GRP) on fish farmers in Niger Delta, Nigeria. Specifically, it sought to ascertain fishery technologies received by GRP fish farmers; determine adoption of fish farming technologies by fish farmers; determine impact of extension services of GRP on socioeconomic condition of the fish farmers as at the year 2012; ascertain farmers’ perceived constraints to adoption of GRP fish farming technologies; ascertain constraints to effective performance of extension services of GRP and determine perceived strategies to improve effectiveness of the extension services of GRP. The study was carried out in Niger Delta, Nigeria. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select 120 fish farmers and 20 GRP personnel. Data were collected through the use of questionnaire and interview schedule. Descriptive statistics (frequency, mean statistic, percentage) were used to present data while t-test, regression, chi-square and factor analysis with varimax rotation were used to analyze the data. Mean age of GRP fish farmers and personnel were 50 and 41.70 years, respectively. Majority (76.7% of fish farmers and 65% of GRP personnel) of respondents were male. Also majority (77.5%) of the fish farmers and all (100%) the GRP personnel were married. The respondents were literates. Majority (70.0) of the fish farmers also engaged in other income generating activities. Average household size of the fish farmers and GRP person.. agronomy project topics

TRENDS IN THE ACTIVITIES OF THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT ANAMBRA STATE